Overview of All English Tenses - Present Tenses - Present Perfect Continuous - Board Game

 

There's another activity for comparing and contrasting the tenses focusing here in this activity on the present perfect and the present perfect continuous. So in the activity, students will start at the start and roll a die. Perhaps they can roll a 5. They will read 'something you've been learning for a long time'. The appropriate sentence may be 'I've been learning English for a long time.' The next student may go and roll 4. They read 'a beautiful place you've visited.' Then, rather than the present perfect continuous, they would use the present perfect tense: 'I visited Paris.' You can encourage students to even ask follow-up questions, which would also include other tenses: 'What was so beautiful about Paris?' Now, this activity will be particularly good for your more advanced students who are capable of using various tenses accurately. It's also good in the beginning of your course when students perhaps don't know each other very well and they're using this as a way to learn about their past experiences.


Below you can read feedback from an ITTT graduate regarding one section of their online TEFL certification course. Each of our online courses is broken down into concise units that focus on specific areas of English language teaching. This convenient, highly structured design means that you can quickly get to grips with each section before moving onto the next.

I struggled a bit with this section and found that I needed to do some more self study in order to understand it. In Afrikaans, my second language, there are only three tenses and no aspects. English, although I easily move between the tenses and aspects, is a lot more complicated and difficult to learn the rules for as a native speaker. This section taught me to be more understanding of the difficulties that second language English speakers have which I have been privileged about not having to suffer through as a native English speaker.