Theories, Methods & Techniques of Teaching - Total Physical Response

 

Our next particular methodology is accredited to James Asher around 1965 and is called total physical response. Asher looked at the way in which we learn our native language and he saw that most children, before they even went to school, have picked up a very large percentage of both the grammar and the vocabulary that they would use in their native language before any type of formal schooling. So Asher started to have a look at ideas of how to use the whole of our brain in language learning in the way that we do when we're very young. It's accepted that within our brain there are two hemispheres, one is the left hemisphere the other is the right hemisphere, and one of the functions of the left hemisphere is language learning. One of the major functions of the right hemisphere is controlling our body's movement and what Asher said was that when we are young what we tend to do in the way in which we learn language, is to use the whole of our brain whereas formal schooling tends to only use half of it, only the left-hand side. So his idea was to try to introduce movement into the process of learning a language so that we're using the whole brain and therefore doubling the capacity of our learning within that process. So the use of motion and learning would be a fairly typical way of using total physical response. If we, for example, are learning the vocabulary of the parts of the body, then we wouldn't just listen and repeat those particular words but we'd actually use movement. So if we were learning the word for our arm, we would move our arm whilst we were saying that word. If we were learning the word hand, we would use our hand whilst we're learning that word and by bringing those two things together, it was shown that would actually enhance the learning process. One of the main positives points to this particular methodology is that it's very good for young students, for young learners. If you can get the young learners to be moving around whilst they're actually learning, then it will enhance the process of learning and they will enjoy it and it's said to give much longer-term retention of those particular vocabulary words than if you were just to say them without any emotion at all. Some of the negative points for this particular methodology; whilst it is good for young learners, obviously, it wouldn't be so good for one-to-one professional learners or for very high levels of grammar. One of the other requirements of this particular methodology goes back into the way in which we learn our native language. Within our native language, we are listening to what's being said around us but there's a long silent period involved in learning our native language, where we don't say anything we're just absorbing the information and then we start to use it. This long silent period is part of the total physical response approach or methodology and therefore we don't get immediate results from this.


Below you can read feedback from an ITTT graduate regarding one section of their online TEFL certification course. Each of our online courses is broken down into concise units that focus on specific areas of English language teaching. This convenient, highly structured design means that you can quickly get to grips with each section before moving onto the next.

In this lesson, we learnt about productive skills. In the productive skills we have speaking and writing.we learnt about the importance of speaking, and we also learned the definition of accuracy and fluency, we also threw more light on how to go about things when teaching the productive skills. I also learnt when it comes to speaking activities we have controlled, guided and creative to guide you in your lesson. In writing skills, we learnt about differences and similarities in it and the point you must consider when teaching this skill.