Lose vs Loose - English Grammar - Teaching Tips

 

This video covers the difference between 'lose' and 'loose'. As these two words have a similar pronunciation and spelling, their usage is often confused. 'Lose' spelled with one 'o' is a verb and means to fail to keep, to fail to win or to fail to make money. Such as in these three examples for each meaning: 1) To fail to keep: I will lose weight but also my hair. 2) To fail to win: I'm expected to lose this game. 3) To fail to make money: I will lose a fortune. The word 'loose' spelled with double 'o', on the other hand is not a verb but an adjective. It means not tight, or free from constraint. A suitable example sentence for the word 'loose' would be: 'These trousers are loose.' We hope this explanation helped you and next time you'll know exactly which word to use.


Below you can read feedback from an ITTT graduate regarding one section of their online TEFL certification course. Each of our online courses is broken down into concise units that focus on specific areas of English language teaching. This convenient, highly structured design means that you can quickly get to grips with each section before moving onto the next.

This unit discussed all the different kinds of supplemental materials that can be used in the English language classroom, except for course books which had already been covered in a previous chapter. It pointed out the pros & cons of using overhead projectors (OHP), provided examples of how visual aids could be used, and how video cameras could be used for either activities or for feedback, among other supplementary materials. It even mentioned YouTube as a resource for the classroom. In addition to that, it provided a list of online resources.