English Grammar Overview - Parts of Speech - Adverbs

 

Now, let's move on to our adverbs. Rather than describing nouns, our adverbs describe our verbs. There are four types of adverbs when describing verbs. They are manner. These describe how things are done. Two examples are: quickly, cleverly. We have adverbs of place, describing where the action happened. Two examples are: here or there. We also have adverbs of time, describing when the action happened, two examples being now or recently. Finally, we have our adverbs of frequency telling us how often the action happens, two examples being often or never. There's also another type of adverb but here, we're going to describe adjectives or other adverbs instead of verbs themselves. These are called adverbs of degree. If we were to take the adjective "intelligent", we could easily say "He's very intelligent," "She's really intelligent," "They're quite intelligent," or "he's extremely intelligent." Now, for other adverbs, we could use the adverb "quickly": "He ran very quickly," "She ran really quickly," "They ran quite quickly," or "He ran extremely quickly."


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