Overview of All English Tenses - Present Tenses - Present Simple Conjugation

 

First and most common we added simply an '-s' for verbs like 'work', 'play'. This is what we typically see within our language. However, when we have verbs with spelling patterns such as ending in '-ch', '-sh', '-z', '-s' and our shorter verbs 'do' and 'go', we have to add our '-es'. Then for verbs the end in a consonant and 'y' we drop our 'y' and add our '-ies'. Finally, we have our irregular verbs 'be' and 'have'. For subject 'I', we use 'am', for the subject 'he', 'she' and 'it', we use 'is', whereas with 'you', 'we', 'they', we use 'are'. Finally, we have 'have', which stays as 'have' for these subjects: 'I', 'you', 'we', 'they' but for 'he', 'she' and 'it', we change 'have' to 'has'.


Below you can read feedback from an ITTT graduate regarding one section of their online TEFL certification course. Each of our online courses is broken down into concise units that focus on specific areas of English language teaching. This convenient, highly structured design means that you can quickly get to grips with each section before moving onto the next.

I really enjoyed the second video, as it provided a great example of a possible way to teach modal auxiliary verbs. The first video, however, made me cringe. I found it difficult to make it all the way through, and some parts reminded me of lessons I have witnessed in the past. ↵↵Of course, in the second video, the students are engaged and seemed happy to be there. It would be interested to see videos of a good teacher in an unmotivated class, i.e. students not engaged through no fault of the teacher, and how the teacher handles it.